Macintosh statistical software  

The Dead Zone: Mac statistics software that appears to have been abandoned

Updated December 31, 2013, but really, does it matter?

EQS

Configurations Available: PowerPC for Mac OS 8 (discontinued); UNIX (runs on Macs in Terminal mode, command line only); no Mac support now.
Current Version: 6.1 (as of 1-24-06)
Listing updated: 12/2010

EQS was developed by Peter Bentler but is now distributed by MVSoft. On OS X, the UNIX version runs under the command line. In Europe, EQS is distributed by ProGamma.

The EQS web site now proclaims:

Due to incompatibilities between EQS for Macintosh and versions 9 and 10 of the Mac operating systems, we have discontinued sales of EQS for Mac.

Even though just after that they wrote:

EQS 6 for Mac UNIX is currently available and will work on any Mac with OS X. Unlike other Mac products with a graphical user interface, it, however, will only work in the UNIX mode of the Mac OS X.

Forecaster online

Configurations: On-line
Listing updated: 11/2013

Forecaster Online is a Web-based data analysis tool specializing in business forecasting, with a relatively easy interface. Developer Prashant Telang wrote around 2010?, “We have kept it free and it will be free for at least the next year. We will be adding ANN and Monte Carlo in around three weeks [from December 15].”At the moment, the site appears dead and there is nothing but a generic place-holder page there.

MX

Mac OS X, Linux, many other versions
Current version: 1.55 (parity)

Last revised: April 19, 2004
Listing updated: 12-15-2010

Mx is a very cross-platform package that even has an on-line and Unix server version; it is written by Michael Neal. While there is a graphic user interface for Windows, the writer recommends doing a server installation to allow for a graphic interface. (Thanks, Stephen J. Read) — consigned to the dead zone, though still available, in August 2010 due to six years without an update.

PlainStat

Current Version: beta
Configurations Available: OS X, PPC or Intel
Listing updated: 11-13-08

It can do correlations, frequencies, descriptives, reliability, various t-tests, ANOVA, linear and canonical regression, factor analysis, K-means clustering, chi-squares, and various nonparametric tests. Plainstat is created and designed by Iyus A. Muslimin, statistician and Mac developer, who lived in Bandung, Indonesia.

Data is hard to type into the spreadsheet-style database at this point, but can easily be copied from spreadsheets such as Excel. Analysis is quick for small data sets and appears in an easy to read output bin in the main (and only) window; each analysis is added to a "table of contents" on the left side, along with the data. Output can be copied, but only without the column headings; it can also be exported to a tab-delimited plain text file for import into spreadsheets (or word processors, but since decimal points are fixed, that might not look very good). Data and value labels can be added via an inspector, a rare find in a free, simple program.

PlainStat might really be all you need — keeping in mind we have not yet verified its results by checking against a more established package. We're waiting with baited breath for the first release, which we hope will also have a facility for setting value and variable labels en masse.

The web site had been given up when we checked back in 2013.

StatisticS (data mining software)

Configurations: Windows; Linux; 68K, PPC, and Universal Binary (OS 7 still available!)
Pricing: 50 euros ($66 at time of writing)
Current Version: 4.3
Listing updated: 12/2009 (thanks, Bill Prinzmetal and Olivier Mericq)

StatisticS had a full graphical interface, does a decent variety of analyses (no regression but it has survival and various comparison tests), and the company infers it’s geared to doctors looking to publish their results. It will run under Rosetta but with the usual potential accuracy issues. Data can be shown in spreadsheet mode and can be imported from Excel; it is smart enough to ask whether the first line contains value labels and the second contains definitions. Charting is instant and rather good and it's easy to restrict analyses by condition; clicking on a bar or a point of a chart leads you to the data window, and clicking in this window leads you to the complete observation. Overall it’s a good buy - a bargain if you need what it can do - even if it requires some forethought to work with. As of 12/17/09, the company's web site had disappeared.

StatPlus

Configurations: Intel with Excel 2004, 2008, or 2011
Pricing: $250 commercial, $130 academic, $110 student; bulk rates exist
Current version: “5 final release” (was last seen at 5.4 in 2009) — labelled “2009 edition” in Dec. 2013
Listing updated: December 2013
Software last updated: 2009

StatPlus is based on a Windows program, but AnalystSoft reprogrammed it completely in Applescript, optimized for either Intel or PPC (which means it takes advantage of the G4 and G5’s math capabilities). Because of this, it is fast and has none of the usual quirks of Windows ports.

StatPlus itself is a fairly small, fast-loading program that has a small number of menus — one that launches Excel; one that provides statistical analyses; and one that manipulates data. The analyses menu provides simple, easily understood categories, and underneath those are submenus with the actual operations. It’s easy to learn, yet contains numerous statistical methods that are not normally provided by easy-to-learn software, including one, two, and three way ANOVAs, GLM models, and many other analyses. The Help system is fully developed, in a standard Mac format, and is moderately easy to read. Cleverly, StatPlus launches Excel automatically when you start it up, saving a step and making it seem more seamless.

This software does not appear to have been updated since 2009 and may not be functional on newer computers. We were unable to get a 2013 demo to work. A reader complained about lack of support. We wrote to the software author in late December 2013 and have not gotten a response.

Xlisp-Statfree Mac statistics software

Configurations Available: 68000; 68020; 680x0 with FPU; PowerPC native; X11
Current Version: 3.52 ?
Price: Free

XLisp-Stat is a statistics toolkit for researchers that is available on the Mac, MS-Windows and various UNIX systems (with the X window system). It was developed by Luke Tierney, University of Minnesota School of Statistics. The software home page was last updated in the 1990s and the FTP link doesn't work. The program seems to have stalled.

Lisp-Stat is an extensible statistical computing environment for data analysis, statistical instruction and research, ... Extensibility is achieved by basing Lisp-Stat on the Lisp language. ... Implementations of XLISP-STAT ... are available for the Macintosh, UNIX systems running X11, and for MS Windows.

MacOS Classic software

If you have any of this software already and want to run it, try using a Mac OS emulator such as SheepShaver (for OS 7-9), or vMac (for OS 6 or 7). Without an emulator, few of these programs can be run on a current Mac.

Package Compatiblity, last version Notes
AppleTree 68020, PPC;
v. 1.34
Free program for fitting multinomial binary tree models to frequency data; file-compatible with the MS-DOS "MBT" program.
BuildSim 68K, PPC;
v 2.0
System design, simulation and analysis package developed by Tritera.
BMDP ? Purchased by SPSS; Mac version dropped; sold by SPSS.
Cricket Graph 68K; v. 1.32 and III

Cricket Graph 1.32 works in Classic. It is still one of the easiest to use graphing programs, and has fast regression curve fitting that makes polynomial designs easy. CricketGraph files can be read by DataGraph.

Data Loom PowerPC Free data visualization program for multivariate data by Carl Manaster.
FloStat 68K; v2.0
Updated 2000
FloStat provided basic analysis; it is still published by Senecio Software (as of April 2010).
GLMstat PowerPC
OS 9, X
v. 6.0
Updated 2005

$25 shareware for generalized linear models with a graphic suer interface. Has spreadsheet-style data entry, many plots and diagrams, statistics, and saving of model specifications.

LISREL PPC; v. 8.7
Updated 2006
("LInear Structural RELations"), developed by Karl Jöreskog and Dag Sörbom; the program for structural equation modeling for years. Version 8.7 had OS X compatibility; by 2008, all mentions of Mac versions were gone.
MacCATI

v 2.5
Updated 2000

MacCati was designed for web- and self-administered surveys, and ran in Java.
MacCurveFit 68K, PPC;
v. 1.5.5
MacCurveFit fits a regression curve to user defined functions using least squares. Pricing remains the same as it was in 2003.
MacSpin 68K: v3.1d3 First 3D data visualization program for the Macintosh (and perhaps any personal computer).
MathCAD “Classic” General purpose math program
Minitab 68K, PPC; v. 10
Updated 1997

Statistics package used mostly in education.

SAS PPC; v.6.12 The last port worked in Classic. JMP is still available on Macs.
StatSoft Statistica 68K; 4.1
Updated 1997
In May 2007, it was still listed for sale on their web site. Caveat emptor, indeed! Statistica once went head to head with SPSS. (In 2010 the Mac version was gone, along with price lists.)
STATsimple 68K; 2.05 $25 shareware with descriptive stats, histograms, student’s t-test and linear regression, by Chris Pereira.
StatView
SuperANOVA
68K, PPC; v5 We miss these programs from Abacus Concepts! SAS bought the company and then dropped support in 2003. StatView and SuperANOVA were fast, capable, and easy to use, but did not have a syntax language.
Systat 68K; v5.21 Bought by SPSS Inc, Mac version dropped, sold to Cranes (of India). A former SPSS employee wrote, “most of the developers that helped build the back end are in no way connected with the present company.”
ViSta 68K, PPC Free program by Forrest Young, Mac version abandoned around 1999. Windows version later picked up by co-author Pedro M. Valero-Mora.

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